This just in.

As part of the Reith transformation, an ooportunity to align on our visual comms across both digital and broadcast surfaced.

For the first time, UX & Broadcast would work together to create a consistent Breaking News language.

breaking_before copy 21
breaking_before1
breaking_before copy1

Problems

01

Branding is not consistent across different touch points

02

There's no attribution to the BBC. We don't own a red globe.

03

We're using different globes and a different red.

2 Become 1.

For the first time, UX and Broadcast designers would be spending a week exploring and designing a 'Breaking' solution that works across both mediums as well as for third-party platforms.

uccollab

Timelines.

We needed to understand the journey of a piece of breaking news - for both mediums. 

A story can be 'Breaking News' for 8 hours on TV, (we followed a story) whereas online, it is only 'Breaking' for 15 minutes.

Needs, expectations and experiences are different.

Breaking Times1
Timeline1
breaking_new1
breaking_desktop1
breakingnew11
phone_square
breakingnew1 copy1

Explained.

Explained.

01

Use Reith to communicate urgency with Bold uppercase.

02

Slap that logo there and let BBC News own the story.

03

Keep our globe, but let's reduce the noise.

03

Keep our globe, but let's reduce the noise.

04

Red all over.

04

Red all over.

Speaking of Red.

During the exploration, we questioned where, when and why we use our red. 

Could we use it to also communicate BREAKING and LIVE content? 

WhiteBanner1
WhiteBanner Copy2

Flexible.

Can we help with the overload of content when we also show a LIVE component?

Using the Brexit story, how can we show stories are related and not constrained by our modular design?

Flexible.

Can we help with the overload of content when we also show a LIVE component?

Using the Brexit story, how can we show stories are related and not constrained by our modular design?

currentthree
allthree

Calm.

Although we believe we should speak louder for BREAKING news, let's not panic. 

Using motion to keep familiarity of the BBC language as well as to convey that a story is developing.